Learning Goals

PreSchool

Preschool

According to the Preschool Curriculum Framework of the California Department of Education,  young children enter preschool with a sense of wonder and a love of
learning. They have an insatiable appetite for knowledge when they have learning experiences that are engaging and enjoyable. Positive experiences in which children can make choices and explore can help them to feel competent and confident.

The Preschool and Kinder program of Woodbridge Academy aims to help parents or guardians achieve those positive experiences by using various resources like worksheets, printables, online games, etc. 

At this stage, the help of the parents is a must; no children can be enrolled at Woodbridge Academy without the assurance that their parents or guardians will help them navigate this enjoyable time. 

Math

In Kindergarten, instructional time will emphasize three areas: (1) developing an understanding of counting to represent the total number of objects in a set and to order the objects within a set; (2) developing an understanding of addition and subtraction and the relationship of these operations to counting and (3) measuring, comparing and categorizing objects according to various attributes, including their two- and three-dimensional shapes.

English ELA

This course supports students struggling to read and write or speak about what they have read in core instruction. Instruction will use explicit, systematic, and sequential approaches to reading instruction, addressing all components of reading, including phonological awareness, phonics, vocabulary, fluency, and reading comprehension.

Teachers will use the listed standards corresponding to student needs based on diagnostic assessments and adjust according to ongoing progress monitoring data.
Effective instruction matches instruction to the needs of the students in the group and provides multiple opportunities to practice the skill and receive feedback. The additional time allotted is in addition to core instruction. The intervention includes materials and strategies designed to supplement core instruction.

Health and Physical Education

This course aims to allow students to gain the knowledge and skills necessary to make healthy choices to improve their quality of life.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following: Core Concepts (health promotion, eating habits, following rules, body parts, and hygiene; Accessing Information (friends, doctors, nurses, hospitals, clinics, basic first aid, rules, emergency drills, and reliable resources; Internal and External Influences (trusted adults and warning labels); Interpersonal Communication (verbal and non-verbal, following rules, trusted adults and refusal skills); Decision Making (positive or negative health enhancing influences, healthy options and safety practices)
Self Management (safety and precautions); Advocacy (personal hygiene and following rules)

Science

This course focuses on Science and Engineering Practices (NRC Framework for K-12 Science Education, 2010) and includes the following content: Asking questions (for science) and defining problems (for engineering). Developing and using models. Planning and carrying out investigations. Analyzing and interpreting data. Using mathematics, information computer technology, and computational thinking. Constructing explanations (for science) and designing solutions (for engineering). Engaging in argument from evidence. Obtaining, evaluating, and communicating information. The resources are presented in a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) format.

History /Social Studies

Kindergarten students will learn about themselves, their families, and the community. Students will be introduced to basic history, geography, economics, and citizenship concepts.

Visual and Performing Arts

Kindergarten art includes exploratory experiences that introduce various concepts and ideas, art and digital media and processes, and the safe use of materials. Students learn art vocabulary, terms, and procedures during the creative process that help them describe and talk about their work.

Click here to view the Kinder and Elementary Curriculum Maps. 

Course descriptions were adapted from CPALMS.

Elementary

Elementary

Woodbridge Academy offers an elementary curriculum organized by grades and subjects like Math, English Language Arts, Science, and History / Social Sciences. 

English Language Arts

The Elementary English Language Arts courses provide students with a look at the ELA standards, focusing on reading foundational skills, reading comprehension strategies through informative and literary texts, writing, grammar, and speaking and listening skills. 

Students will participate in informative, narrative, and opinion writing compositions throughout the course. Throughout the English Language Arts courses, students will explore various topics through integration across content areas. 

Mathematics 

Students will review content that covers number sense, graphing, measurement, fractions, decimals, word problems, and other math topics, such as multiplication, subtraction, division, and adding.

Science

In elementary science, students work through homework assignments or prepare for class projects. They learn about science topics such as astronomy, light, sound, and scientific investigation. Upper grades cover energy, matter, the solar system, rocks, weather, ecosystems, etc. Finally, science courses provide teachers, parents, and students with an exciting way to go over the scientific processes that affect the world around us.

History / Social Studies

The Social Studies courses utilize a personal approach to introduce students to community and citizenship. By providing scaffolded instruction from Kindergarten through 5th grade, students develop a firm understanding of essential concepts and skills related to history, geography, and economics. Students will analyze grade-appropriate passages to reinforce reading comprehension and writing skills.

In First grade, students develop an understanding of citizenship in the home, school, and community. Second grade focuses on the geography of North America, the impact of immigration, and the foundations of American citizenship. The third grade includes a closer look at American History and Civics. This includes studying regions with the United States and the physical and cultural characteristics of Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean Islands. In Fourth grade, students explore the essential people, places, and events that shaped the state of California. In Fifth grade, students focus on American history through 1850 from Native Americans through exploration, colonization, and early American history.

Physical Education

This course is designed for elementary school students and is intended to last 18 weeks. This course aims to give students the knowledge, skills, and values they need to become healthy and physically active for a lifetime. This course addresses physical fitness’s health and skill-related components, which are critical for students’ success.

Visual and Performing Arts

Grade one art includes experimenting with various concepts and ideas in art and digital media and processes while using materials correctly and safely to convey personal interests. Students use accurate art vocabulary, terms, and procedures to describe and discuss their work during the creative process.

Grades two, three, and four include experimenting with various two- and three-dimensional concepts and ideas in art and digital media and processes. Materials are correctly and safely applied to convey personal interests and self-expression. Students use accurate art vocabulary, terms, and procedures with resources and time-management skills during the creative process. Attributes of artworks from individuals, cultures, and time are identified, described, and discussed.

Grade five incorporates a variety of two- and three-dimensional concepts and ideas in art and digital media and processes to influence personal artistic decisions and create visual unity. Materials are correctly, safely, and responsibly applied to achieve diverse effects and meet established criteria. An art-criticism process leads to a hypothesis about the meanings of creative products and utilitarian objects. Observation skills and prior knowledge are employed to reflect on and revise personal works of art. Students use accurate art vocabulary, terms, procedures, time management, and collaborative skills during the creative process.

Health

This course aims to allow students to gain the knowledge and skills necessary to make healthy choices to improve their quality of life and describe the relationships between healthy behavior, environment, and personal health to prevent injuries and health problems.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following: Accessing Information (family health, following rules, friends, trusted adults in school and community); Internal and External Influences (warning labels and community helpers); Interpersonal Communication (conflict resolution, verbal and non-verbal, reporting, active listening and refusal skills); Decision Making (positive/negative healthy options and decisions); Goal Setting (short and long term health targets, personal health and small groups); Self Management (personal health choices); Advocacy (positive promotion and modeling healthy choices)

Course descriptions were adapted from CPALMS.

Click here to view the Kinder and Elementary Curriculum Maps. 

Middle School

Middle School

Mathematics

  • In Grade 6, instructional time will emphasize five areas: (1) performing all four operations with integers, positive decimals, and positive fractions with procedural fluency; (2) exploring and applying concepts of ratios, rates, and percent to solve problems; (3) creating, interpreting and using expressions and equations; (4) extending geometric reasoning to plotting points on the coordinate plane, area and volume of geometric figures and (5) extending understanding of statistical thinking.

  • In Grade 7, instructional time will emphasize five areas: (1) recognizing that fractions, decimals, and percentages are different representations of rational numbers and performing all four operations with rational numbers with procedural fluency; (2) creating equivalent expressions and solving equations and inequalities; (3) developing an understanding of and applying proportional relationships in two variables; (4) extending the analysis of two- and three-dimensional figures to include circles and cylinders and (5) representing and comparing categorical and numerical data and developing an understanding of probability.

  • In Grade 8, instructional time will emphasize six areas: (1) representing numbers in scientific notation and extending the set of numbers to the system of real numbers, which includes irrational numbers; (2) generating equivalent numeric and algebraic expressions, including using the Laws of Exponents; (3) creating and reasoning about linear relationships including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation; (4) solving linear equations, inequalities, and systems of linear equations; (5) developing an understanding of the concept of a function and (6) analyzing two-dimensional figures, particularly triangles, using distance, angle and applying the Pythagorean Theorem.

Visual Arts

Students become proficient in and refine their use of concepts, terminology, techniques, and applications of digital imaging to create original work. Students produce digital still and/or animated images through the single or combined use of computers, digital cameras, digital video cameras, scanners, photo editing software, drawing and painting software, graphic tablets, printers, new media, and emerging technologies. Students’ increasingly independent approach to work promotes risk-taking in completing conceptually based, self-directed work. Through the critique process, students evaluate and respond to their work and that of their peers to measure artistic growth. This course incorporates hands-on activities, the use of technology, and the consumption of art materials.

English ESL

This course aims to enable middle school students who are native speakers of languages other than English to develop proficient listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in the English language. Emphasis will be on acquiring integrated English communication skills in a wide range of content and activities using texts of high complexity to ensure college and career preparation and readiness.

English Language Arts (ELA)

These courses define what students should understand and be able to do by the end of Middle School. At this grade level, students are building their facility with rhetoric, the craft of using language in writing and speaking, and using classic literature, essays, and speeches as mentor texts.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following: A study of a variety of short literary collections, including poetry, one-act plays, short stories, and memoirs, to determine and practice the use of figurative, denotative, and connotative language story structure, poetic forms, and creative pacing techniques reciprocal nature of the content and form writing for varied purposes and in varied genres, including personal and dramatic narratives, various poetic forms, plays and multimedia productions, multi-genre and creative nonfiction selections digital writing platforms collaboration amongst peers, especially regarding peer reviews of multiple drafts.

History /Social Studies

The social studies curriculum for this level consists of the following content area strands: World History, Geography, Economics, Civics, and Government. The primary content for this course pertains to the concepts and methodologies used in the social studies disciplines and their applications in contemporary and historical contexts.

Content includes, but is not limited to, the basic concepts and methodology of the social studies disciplines, interdisciplinary concepts of change, conflict, interdependence, choice, and impact of the environment, development of reasoning and information-processing skills, applications of the social studies to contemporary issues and concerns, applications of the social studies to the study of California. Students will be exposed to multiple social studies disciplines, including history, geography, political science, economics, sociology, psychology, and anthropology. Students will study methods of historical inquiry and primary and secondary historical documents.

Science

Laboratory investigations that include scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem-solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are integral to this course.

School laboratory investigations are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p.

Laboratory investigations in the middle school classroom should help all students develop a growing understanding of the complexity and ambiguity of empirical work and the skills to calibrate and troubleshoot equipment used to make observations. Learners should understand measurement errors and have the skills to aggregate, interpret, and present the resulting data (NRC 2006, p. 77; NSTA, 2007).

Physical Education

This course is designed for middle school students and is intended to last 18 weeks. This course aims to give students the knowledge, skills, and values they need to become healthy and physically active for a lifetime. This course addresses physical fitness’s health and skill-related components, which are critical for students’ success.

Health

This course aims to allow students to gain the knowledge and skills necessary to become health literate and practice responsible behaviors to promote healthy living. This comprehensive course focuses on making wise personal decisions and respecting and promoting the health of others.

The content should include but is not limited to Mental and emotional health (personal health care, screenings, counseling, negotiation skills, bullying, coping skills, and depression); prevention and control of disease (non-communicable, sexually transmitted diseases, STDs, and HIV/AIDS). Consumer health (risk reduction behaviors, policies/laws, medical resources, and conflict resolution)
Family life (cultures, daily routines, and rules). Personal health (risk reduction behaviors, communication skills, social relationships, wellness, and reproductive health). Nutrition (weight management, fitness plan, eating disorders, and BMI)
Internet safety (security, threats, media, cyber-bullying parental controls, and monitoring). Injury prevention and safety (rules, bullying, water safety, weapons safety, and first aid/CPR/AED). Substance use and abuse (harmful effects of alcohol, tobacco, other drugs, and over-the-counter drugs). Community health (local health organizations, technology, resources, and services). Environmental health (adverse health effects, chemicals, toxins, and pollutants). Consumer health (advertising, media influence, products, and services). Teen dating violence (dating, media, abuse, and violence)

Course descriptions are adapted from CPALMS.

Click here to see Middle School Curriculum Maps. 

High School

High School

Grades 9, 10, 11 & 12 (+15 years)

High School Curriculum 

To graduate from Woodbridge Academy, you must earn at least 28 out of 32 possible credits. If you are a transfer student or participating in the Dual Diploma Program, you must earn at least eight credits from Woodbridge Academy.

History /Social Sciences (A) 4 credits.

Grade 9

Economics – The grade 9-12 Economics course consists of the following content area strands: Economics and Geography. The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to studying the concepts and processes of the national and international economic systems. Content should include, but is not limited to, currency, banking, and monetary policy, the fundamental concepts relevant to the major economic systems, the global market and economy, major economic theories and economists, the role and influence of the government and fiscal policies, monetary measurements, tools, and methodology, financial and investment markets, and the business cycle.

Grade 10

Eastern and Western Heritage – The grade 9-12 Eastern and Western Heritage course consists of the following content area strands: World History, American History, Geography, and Humanities. The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to the study of the world’s earliest civilizations to the ancient and classical civilizations of Africa, Asia, and Europe. Content will include, but is not limited to, the birth of civilizations throughout the world, including the origins of societies from Mesopotamia, Africa, China, India, and Mesoamerica from the perspective of cultural geography, growth, dissemination, and decline of four classic civilizations of India, China, Greece, and Rome, the role of isolation and interaction in the development of the Byzantine Empire, African and Mesoamerican civilizations, India, China, Japan, and Europe, and the emergence of social, political, economic, and religious institutions and ideas.

Grade 11

United States Government – The grade 9-12 United States Government course consists of the following content area strands: Geography, Civics, and Government. The primary content for the course pertains to the study of government institutions and political processes and their historical impact on American society. Content should include, but is not limited to, the functions and purpose of government, the function of the state, the constitutional framework, federalism, separation of powers, functions of the three branches of government at the local, state, and national level, and the political decision-making process.

This course includes a comparative discussion of political ideologies, such as communism and totalitarianism, that conflict with the principles of freedom and democracy essential to the founding principles of the United States.

Grade 12

AP Human Geography is an introductory college-level human geography course. Students cultivate their understanding of human geography through data and geographic analyses as they explore patterns and spatial organization, human impacts and interactions with their environment, spatial processes, and societal changes.

English ELA (B) 4 credits.

This course defines what students should understand and be able to do by the end of 12th grade. Knowledge acquisition should be the primary purpose of any reading approach, as systematically building a wide range of knowledge across domains is a prerequisite to higher literacy. At this grade level, students are working with universal themes and archetypes. They are also continuing to build their facility with rhetoric, the craft of using language in writing and speaking, using classic literature, essays, and speeches as mentor texts.

The content should include, but not be limited to, the following: active reading of exemplar writing models to examine text craft and structure; development of stated or implied theme(s) throughout a literary text; analyze the central idea(s) implied or explicit, and its development throughout a text; explain how figurative language contributes to tone and meaning in the text(s); identify rhetorical appeals in a text (logos, pathos, ethos); paraphrase content from grade-level texts; compare and contrast how authors from different periods address the same or related topics; writing for varied purposes, including writing personal or fictional narratives using narrative techniques, precise words and phrases, and figurative language; write and support a claim using logical reasoning, relevant evidence, elaboration, and a logical organizational structure; write expository texts to explain and/or analyze information from multiple sources improve writing by planning, revising, and editing; considering feedback from adults and peers; follow the rules of standard English grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling appropriate to grade level; use proper collaborative techniques and active listening skills when engaging in discussions in a variety of situations.

English ESL (B) 4 credits.

This course is available only to foreign students who will not enroll in a US College. It is required to obtain at least a B2 CERF (Common European Reference Framework) level.

The purpose of this course is to enable students who are native speakers of languages other than English to develop proficient listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in the English language. Emphasis will be on acquiring integrated English communication skills in a wide range of content and activities using texts of high complexity to ensure college and career preparation and readiness.

Math (C) 4 credits.

Grade 9

In Algebra 1, instructional time will emphasize five areas: (1) performing operations with polynomials and radicals and extending the Laws of Exponents to include rational exponents; (2) extending understanding of functions to linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and using them to model and analyze real-world relationships; (3) solving quadratic equations in one variable and systems of linear equations and inequalities in two variables; (4) building functions, identifying their key features and representing them in various ways and (5) representing and interpreting categorical and numerical data with one and two variables.

Grade 10

In Algebra 2, instructional time will emphasize five areas: (1) extending arithmetic operations with algebraic expressions to include radical and rational expressions and polynomial division; (2) graphing and analyzing functions including polynomials, absolute value, radical, rational, exponential, and logarithmic; (3) building functions using compositions, inverses, and transformations; (4) extending systems of equations and inequalities to include non-linear expressions and (5) developing an understanding of the complex number system, including complex numbers as roots of polynomial equations.

Grade 11

In Geometry, instructional time will emphasize five areas: (1) proving and applying relationships and theorems involving two-dimensional figures using Euclidean geometry and coordinate geometry; (2) establishing congruence and similarity using criteria from Euclidean geometry and using rigid transformations; (3) extending knowledge of geometric measurement to two-dimensional figures and three-dimensional figures; (4) creating and applying equations of circles in the coordinate plane and (5)developing an understanding of right triangle trigonometry.

Grade 12

In Precalculus Honors, instructional time will emphasize six areas: (1) extending right triangle trigonometry to unit circle trigonometry and trigonometric functions; (2) extending understanding of functions to trigonometric; (3) developing an understanding of conic sections; (4) representing and performing operations with complex numbers and vectors in the coordinate plane; (5) extending understanding of relations in the plane using parametric representations, including polar coordinates and (6) analyzing arithmetic and geometric sequences and series.

Science (D) 4 credits.

Biology; Chemistry, Physics, Earth /Space Sciences.

Laboratory investigations that include scientific inquiry, research, measurement, problem-solving, laboratory apparatus and technologies, experimental procedures, and safety procedures are integral to this course. The National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) recommends that all students be in the science lab or field at the high school level, collecting data every week. School laboratory investigations (labs) are defined by the National Research Council (NRC) as an experience in the laboratory, classroom, or field that provides students with opportunities to interact directly with natural phenomena or with data collected by others using tools, materials, data collection techniques, and models (NRC, 2006, p. 3). 

Spanish (E) 2 credits.

This course aims to enable students whose heritage language is Spanish to develop, maintain, and enhance proficiency in their heritage language by reinforcing and expanding listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills, as well as Spanish grammar skills acquired in Spanish. Students are exposed to a variety of Spanish literary genres and authors. Language Arts Standards are also included in this course to enable students to become literate in Spanish and better understand the nature of their own language and other languages to be acquired. The course content will continue reflecting the cultural values of the Spanish language and societies.

Visual Arts Honors (F) 1 credit.

Students explore advanced topics through project-based work, becoming more self-directed in acquiring and using concepts, terminology, techniques, and applications to design, create, print, and display original two-dimensional graphic and fine works of art in print and web formats as they become more adept at using the tools and techniques available to them, students design and produce digital still images through the single or combined use of computers, digital cameras, scanners, photo editing software, drawing and painting software, graphic tablets, printers, new media, and emerging technologies. Through the critique process, students evaluate and respond to their designs and images and those of their peers to measure artistic growth with increasing sophistication and independence to promote risk-taking in completing conceptually based, self-directed work. This course incorporates hands-on activities, the use of technology, and the consumption of art materials.

Electives (G) 1 credit.

Technology

Students explore the fundamental concepts, terminology, techniques, and applications of digital imaging to create original work. Students produce digital still images through the single or combined use of computers, digital cameras, scanners, photo editing software, drawing and painting software, graphic tablets, printers, new media, and emerging technologies. Through critique, students evaluate and respond to their work and peers to measure artistic growth. This course incorporates hands-on activities, the use of technology, and the consumption of art materials.

Project Management

The Project Management Institute has approved this course from Study.com to help you prepare for PMI certification. You can train your employees in project management using this short Introduction to the Principles of Project Management course, which covers the entire process from planning to closure. This corporate training resource is available on a flexible, mobile-friendly platform.

Religion

World Religions – The grade 9-12 World Religions course consists of the following content area strands: World History, Geography, and Humanities. The primary content emphasis for this course pertains to studying major world religious traditions of Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism, and Taoism. Students will identify criteria upon which religious beliefs are based, analyze relationships between religious, social, and political institutions, trace the significant developments of the world’s living religions, distinguish the similarities and differences among the world’s major religious traditions, synthesize information and ideas from conflicting religious beliefs, and interpret the development of society as reflected by its religious beliefs.

Statistics Honors

In Probability and Statistics Honors, instructional time will emphasize four areas: (1) creating and interpreting data displays for univariate and bivariate categorical and numerical data; (2) comparing and making observations about populations using statistical data, including confidence intervals and hypothesis testing; (3) extending understanding of probability and probability distributions and (4) developing an understanding of methods for collecting statistical data, including randomized trials.

Physical Education

This course aims to develop and enhance healthy behaviors influencing lifestyle choices and student health and fitness. Students will combine the learning of principles and background information in a classroom setting with the physical application of the knowledge. A majority of class time should be spent on physical activity.

In addition to the physical education content represented in the benchmarks below, specific health education topics within this course include but are not limited to Mental/Social Health, Physical Activity, Components of Physical Fitness, Nutrition and Wellness Planning, Diseases and Disorders, and Health Advocacy.

Course descriptions were adapted from CPALMS.

A to G High School Requirements

All High School graduate students must comply with the A to G graduation requirements stated by the University of California System

Click on the image above to open an infographic

Credit transfer

You can transfer up to 75% of previous credits to Woodbridge Academy under the following rules:

  • The courses or credits must be similar to those offered by Woodbridge Academy. 
  • There is no discount on the tuition. 
  • You can submit a ticket using the Student Services app and send a digital copy of all your official transcripts in English or Spanish to see which credits apply. 
  • Please allow at least ten business days for an answer.